Mountains Restoration Trust

Louisville High School volunteers at Headwaters Corner!

 

 

On March 12, three school staff members and 52 sophomore girls lent their support to MRT as they worked on a few different projects at Headwater`s Corner and across the street at Wild Walnut Park. The girls rotated between stations where they got a chance to help plant native trees on a slope above Dry Canyon Creek, repair invasive crayfish traps, remove old asphalt and concrete from a dry creek bed and cut off the above ground portions of plant cages from established plants.

 

The end result of their morning of labor included the addition of 15 coast live oaks, five California black walnuts and five blue elderberries to a hillside with sparse native tree cover. The students also removed enough asphalt and concrete to fill 12 wheelbarrows loads, and repaired all of our torn traps. Wow! Volunteer efforts like this keep us moving in the right direction. Our thanks go to all the girls and the staff who reach out to us with their offer of service.

 

In the coming months MRT will be hosting events for two returning volunteer groups: FedEx and Getty Museum employees. Good to know they enjoyed their time with us so much that they want to come back and help some more. They got a lot done the first time: planting, weeding and removing crayfish. We look forward to working with all of these enthusiastic hard-working volunteers again.

 

If your group is looking for a great team building community service activity, give us a call at (818) 591-1701 ex. 202.

 

 

The Santa Monica Mountains, a unique transverse range, running along the western edge of Los Angeles County`s LA Basin and the San Fernando Valley and ending in Ventura County, represents the collision of urban sprawl and the wild, producing enclaves that neither belong entirely to the city nor to the mountains.

For more than 30 years Mountains Restoration Trust (MRT) has worked to preserve, protect and restore this fragile ecosystem by offering responsible preservation and restoration programs, acquiring resource-rich land, and offering educational and recreational activities to the public.